These Historic Photos Taken By A Jewish Photographer Were Hidden From the Nazis So They Wouldn’t Find Them

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Almost everyone knows the tragic story of the Jews and how they were treated by the Nazis. During that time, many families hid important items from the Nazis, even masking their identities to stay safe. In 1944, Henryk Ross, a Jewish photographer, hid a box of photos.
After the war, Ross came back for his photos. Many were ruined, but some remained intact. They are truly a heartbreaking reminder of the atrocities of the Holocaust.
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1940-1944: Sign For Jewish Residential Area (“Jews. Entry Forbidden”)

Ross is from Lodz, Poland and was a Jewish photographer before and during the war.
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1944: A Boy Walks Among A Crowd Of People Being Deported In Winter

In 1944, during the height of the Holocaust, Ross hid a box of photos underground.
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1940-1942: Woman With Her Child (Ghetto Policemen’s Family)

Before the war, Ross was a sports and news photographer, making a living taking everyday pictures near his home.
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1940: Henryk Ross Photographing For Identification Cards, Jewish Administration, Department Of Statistics

To survive during the war, Ross took photos of propaganda and identity pictures for the Nazi Department of Statistics.
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1940-1944: Portrait Of A Couple

Ross also risked his life taking day to day photos of life in the Lodz ghetto.
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1944: A Mass Deportation Of Ghetto Residents

This startling image captures the many, many residents of Lodz who were relocated to the death camps during the Holocaust.
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1940-1944: Ghetto Buildings

The Lodz ghetto was a place of extreme desperation and extreme heartbreak.
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1942: Police With Woman Behind Barbed Wire At The Ghetto

The way that people were treated in the Lodz ghetto was astonishing and this woman is a unique portrayal of what Jews were subjected to.
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1942: Evacuation Of The Sick

Many times, in the ghetto, the sick were removed and essentially exterminated after being starved and mistreated for months at a time.
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1940: Baking Flat Bread

Despite the hardship, you can see from this photo that people had a resilient spirit and found things to smile about.
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1940: A Man Who Saved The Torah From The Rubble Of The Synagogue On Wolborska Street

There were many unspeakable things that occurred during the Holocaust, but this man is doing his best to preserve part of the Jews’ way of life.
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1940-1944: A Boy Searching For Food

Food was hard to come by in the Lodz ghetto, and residents often ate things they never would have otherwise.
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1940-1942: Lodz Ghetto Prison At Czarnecki Street, A Rallying Point Before Deportation

It’s absolutely heartbreaking to see these young men with Jewish stars pinned to their clothing.
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1942: Children Being Transported To Chelmno Nad Nerem (Renamed Kulmhof) Death Camp

The loss of so many children was one of the most heart rending aspects of the deportation to death camps across Europe.
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1940-1944: A Group Of Women With Sacks And Pails, Walking Past Synagogue Ruins Heading For Deportation

It’s hard to believe what these people are facing as they head to the trains for deportation.
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1944: Food Pails And Dishes Left Behind By Ghetto Residents Who Had Been Deported To Death Camps

The untold number of possessions left behind is a poignant reminder of the tragedy that was the Holocaust.
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1945: Henryk Ross’ Excavating His Hidden Box Of Negatives And Documents From The Lodz Ghetto

After the war, Ross was able to salvage some of his photos so he could share the horror with the world.
Source: Pinterest


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